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ICESP VII CONFERENCE PAPER ABSTRACTS KL-1 SERIES

Held in Kyongju, Korea
September 20-25. 1998

The International Conference on Electrostatic Precipitation (ICESP) is the official conference of the International Society for Electrostatic Precipitation (ISESP).  

The following is a list of the Abstracts for the KL-1 Series papers from the VII ICESP Conference.  

KL01  What’s New of China ESP
Wang Liqian
Nanjing Electric Power Environmental Protection Science Research Institute

Abstract
Some new progresses of China ’s ESP researches and industries are briefly described, such as: year output and its distribution, the so-called lentoid ESP, roof ESP, ESP simulating installation and apparatus, LC constant current power source, etc.  Finally, the research of impact on fly ash conductivity by iron and carbon content is also mentioned.

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KL02  Japanese State-of the-Art for Non-thermal Plasma
Tetsuji Oda
Department of Electrical Engineering, The University of Tokyo

Abstract
Present research status on atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma application for environmental control in Japan will be reviewed.  DeNOx and DeSOx technology by corona induced plasma was developed.  As residual gaseous compositions strongly affect the DeNOx processing performance, combination with catalysts and/or additives is under research now.  On the other hand, TCE (trichloroethylene) is economically decomposed by a barrier discharge reactor excited by 50 Hz and its practical usage will be done near future.  Some other VOCs will be also processed easily.  Some new researches, mostly combination processes, are shown with researcher’s group name

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KL03  Practical Problems with Electrostatic Precipitators Can Provide Significant Contribution to Science
Robert A. <astropietro
Research-Cottrell, Inc.

Abstract
Electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) have served industry as dust and aerosol collectors since being invented by Frederick Cottrell in 1907.  Since that time, the design and sizing of ESPs has changed dramatically.  Required emissions from ESPs have decreased from those required for “good neighbor policy”, to those required to protect public health (PM-10/PM-2.5) or sensitive downstream equipment.  Additionally, industry is constantly changing processes and operating conditions to which we must apply ESPs, which create applications challenges.  Lastly the ESP suppliers themselves are making changes to the electrode geometry, insulator assemblies, boundary clearances, etc. to make the product less costly.  Occasionally changes result in a practical problem with the new ESP design, which require solutions.  However, these practical problems opportunity and incentive to advance the science of electrostatic precipitation.

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KL04  Analysis of ESP Parameters Critical for control of fine Particulate Matter
Wang Liqian
Nanjing Electric Power Environmental Protection Science Research Institute

Abstract
Recent epidemiology studies suggest that there is a connection between fine particulate matter and health effects, including excess mortality.  The electrostatic precipitator is often characterized by its total collection efficiency, but it collects particles of different sizes with varying efficiencies.  It is therefore appropriate to study the size=dependent performance of precipitators and examine those parameters that have the most effect on that performance for fine particles.  By using precipitator models, it is possible to determine the sensitivity of the fine particle emissions to changes of each parameter.  Many parameters have been investigated: voltage, gas volume, plate area, gas composition, temperature, wave form, resistivity and others.  The resulting calculations allow a ranking of parameters according to their emissions sensitivity.  The parameters for which the fine particle emissions are most sensitive are average voltage and peak voltage, followed by gas volume and plate area.  Fine particle emissions are least sensitive to gas velocity maldistribution.  The sensitivity rankings allow precipitator modifications to be optimized for the best performance at the least cost.

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KL05  Why Does ESLP Possess Better Performance?

Abstract
Abstract not available
 
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